Off the radar revisionism only works because The People want to forget

Oh dear.

I wish I could write about happy things.

However, I’m afraid my sadness today is off the radar.

I had hoped that the revisionism disease in the mainstream apropos dodgy dealings at Ibrox had been cleared up.

Sadly, it now seems full blown.

Try this for size:

“Back at the start when Craig Whyte dispatched a banning order to the Daily Record HQ for warning them about his season-ticket scam – a full six months before it eventually tipped the club into the grubby hands of the administrators”

The entire tour de farce can be read here at the Daily Radar.

Click the link at your own discretion.

Now, dear reader please count back six months from February 2012.

However many times you try you don’t get to the start of June 2011.

Here is my analysis of the Whyte regime a few weeks after he had parted with his pound and been given the keys to the Big House.

Now here from 2013 is a Professor of journalism giving his assessment of the Daily Radar and the Rangers story.

And here from 2014 when Professor Greenslade used the term “stenographers” to describe the succulent bams.

My own take is that the Daily Radar operates on the basis that the collective memory of The People is a bit dodgy.

Whatever excrement comes down the pipe at Ibrox in the coming period regular readers here will not be in the surprised camp.

Since the Off Licence Putsch of March 2015, this site has charted King’s duplicitous reign of error.

However, others were cheerleading from the sides lines.

The local media desperately wanted a convicted criminal to oust a genuine billionaire.

Moreover, Ashley had guys in the building working to a self-sustaining agenda.

Yet the stenographers could detect the heady aroma of succulent impala from south of the Limpopo.

The man with 41 criminal convictions could count on the sports desks in Glasgow to push his case to The People.

Their excitement when King entered the Big House was off the radar.

 

 

 

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